University of Missouri Animal Resource Center

University of Missouri Animal Resource Center

The University of Missouri Animal Resource Center was originally designed by The Clark Enersen Partners as part of a National Institutes of Health CO6 grant in 2004. The proposal scored well that year, but fell just short of the funding limit. The NIH later approached the University of Missouri about reviving the grant as part of its new stimulus funding initiative in 2009 and The Clark Enersen Partners was once again selected to assist with the preparation of the updated grant materials. The project was quickly funded and design for construction commenced in November of 2009.

The Animal Resource Center is a stand-alone 17,540-square-foot structure. It primarily consists of a single story, slab-on-grade building comprised of a 15,387-square-foot main level with a 2,153-square-foot mechanical penthouse above. The mechanical penthouse floor space is captured within the area created by the sloping roof structure over the main level of the facility. The main level supports animal holding rooms and core facilities including procedure rooms, treatment rooms, a small surgery suite, a catheterization laboratory, and support spaces. The building also includes a small office suite and break room near the front entry. As an NIH funded project on at an AAALAC accredited institution, the facility was designed to meet all aspects of both regulatory agencies. It was also the very first animal facility in the nation where the NIH allowed the use of a demand control ventilation system to increase energy efficiency.

The animal area is equipped to provide state-of-the-art ABSL-2 research space, and all primary electrical and mechanical equipment features redundant systems. The animal spaces are entered through a dedicated shower and locker area and is able to convert to a shower-out facility, if needed. Exterior construction consists of a blend of brick masonry and decorative, insulated metal panels in keeping with the local context of the veterinary campus. The new structure houses a variety of existing and proposed research programs to serve both Veterinary Medicine and the department of Psychology. Animals initially housed included swine, dogs, and cats with the possible future means to accommodate other species.